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PISTOLETS RELATIFS FRANÇAIS DE LA GUERRE CIVILE AMÉRICAINE

PARTIE 1 DE 3

 

French Related Pistols of the American Civil War

Part 1 of 3

 



     This is the first of three photo discourses on French related revolvers used in the American Civil War. These pistols, as pictured below, are from top to bottom:

1.  A  Liege manufactured E. LeFaucheux Brevete 6 shot, 12 millimeter (.47 cal.) pinfire cartridge single action revolver.

2.  A Paris, France made Perrin 6 shot, 12 millimeter (.47 cal.) center fire internal primed cartridge double action only revolver.

3.  An unmarked George Raphael 6 shot, 11 millimeter (.42 cal) center fire internal primed cartridge double action revolver.

 

 


 

 

PART 1
 
LIEGE MANUFACTURED E. LEFAUCHEUX BREVETE
6 SHOT, 12 MILLIMETER PINFIRE CARTRIDGE SINGLE ACTION REVOLVER
 
 

E. LeFaucheux Brevete Pin Fire Left Side View
 
 

E. LeFaucheux Brevete Pin Fire Right Side View
 

     This weapon is 12¼" in a straight line from the end of the butt to the front of the 6-1/8" long barrel.  It has dark walnut finely checked two piece grips.  There is a lanyard ring in the metal capped butt. There is a spur on the trigger guard.  It is Liege proofed under E. LeFaucheux license.  The proof and special markings are shown in the following photographs.


     About 12,000 of the LeFaucheux army type revolvers were purchased for the Union Army during the Civil War.  Some were also purchased by the South and still many, many more were privately purchased by soldiers and officers on both sides.
     Probably the most notable person to carry one was Stonewall Jackson. However, it wasn't this one.  This one has a "W B O" stamped into the upper left grip just to the rear of a scalloped design.  Below that stamping is stamped a minuscule "OHIO" . It is so small, like in  4 or 5 point type that it must be read with a magnifying glass.  However, thanks to the magic of a brand new digital camera, it can be seen in the following photograph.
 

E. LeFaucheux Brevete Pin Fire Grip View
 

     The frame is marked horizontally on the left side "E.LEFAUCHEUX" over "INVR BREVETE". To the right is stamped vertically a "T" under a crown. The serial number of the gun is on the same side below the cylinder above the trigger guard.  It is stamped horizontally "16592".
 

E. LeFaucheux Brevete Pin Fire Frame Marking

 

E. LeFaucheux Brevete Pin Fire Frame Marking

 


     The cylinder is stamped with a "E" over "LG" in an oval.  To the rear of that marking  is a "T" under a crown.  To the left, one cylinder stop, is a "L" under a crown (not shown).  On the bottom of the barrel just forward of the ejector housing  is another crown over "L" and a parts number, a "10" or a "19" ( The second digit has been over stamped). A script "D" is on the bottom of the ejector housing.
 

E. LeFaucheux Brevete Pin Fire Cylinder Marking

 

E. LeFaucheux Brevete Pin Fire Barrel Marking

 


     On the rear of the cylinder is the parts number "10" or "19".  In this picture one can see the slot that the upright pin on the pinfire cartridge slides into.  The metallic pin fire cartridge is on the right.  When the trigger is pulled the hammer falls on the upright pin and drives it into a firing cap which is inside the copper cartridge under the pin.  This, of course, ignites the powder in back of the lead bullet and propels the bullet on its way.  Pull! Squish! Bang! Whizzzzzz.......
 

E. LeFaucheux Brevete Pin Fire Cylinder Marking

 

E. LeFaucheux Brevete Pin Fire Cartridge

 


     A picture showing the view of the bottom of the pistol follows:
 

E. LeFaucheux Brevete Pin Fire Bottom View
 

     Let's hear it for the Pinfire Pistol.  All together now!

 

"Viva la France - et hooray pour le pistolet de pinfire"!
(figure it out for yourself!)
 


     Be sure to join us next week for Part 2 of 3,  a pictorial discourse on the French Perrin Revolver.
     Thank you for viewing this presentation.  My son, Reed Radcliffe, the webmaster, also thanks you.

Dave Radcliffe