ArmsCollectors.com menu


ArmsCollectors.com
Main Page


Learn - Basics

Dates in Firearm History

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions
(From the Cody Firearms Museum)

Links to Forums
At Other Sites

Evaluating History of a Gun
Article by Jim Supica


Learn - Advanced

Factory Letters
And Military Records


Museums With Arms Exhibits

Arms Collector Groups

Other Useful Links

Book Recommendations

Book Reviews


Specialties

U.S. Military Arms

Factory Letters
And Military Records


Krag Bolt Removal

Which U.S. Bayonet?

M1917 Enfield Parts Markings
(from M1903.com)

M1917 Enfield Sling Instructions

M1 Garand Disassembly and Parts
(from CivilianMarksmanship.com)


Cartridges and Ammunition
International Ammunition Association

CartridgedCollectors.org

European Cartridge Research Association
http://www.ecra-net.de/

Cartridge-Corner.com
(headstamp info)


Edged Weapons
Society of American Bayonet Collectors
BayonetCollectors.org

Sword Collector Homepage

Internet Sword Collectors


Recommended
Dealers

OldGuns.net


Manufacture Dates

Pre-1899 Antique
Serial Numbers

(From Empire Arms. Use at own risk.)

Marlin

Mauser Pistol C-96
(Broomhandle)

Remington

Ruger
(& Factory Letters)

U.S. Military

Winchester


Markings

Serial Numbers
(foreign language)

Gun Marks

House Brands

U.S. Inspectors

WWII German
Codes & Markings

Mosin Nagant Markings


Warnings

Spotting Fake Firearms
Antiques Roadshow Advice

Fakes
Article by Jim Supica

The Anti-Gun
Crowd Wants

YOUR COLLECTOR
GUNS TOO!

Article by David Kopel


Collection Care & Records
(Preservation tips, inventory software, insurance)


Arms / Gun Show Listings

NRA List

Man At Arms List

Shotgun News List

Crossroads List


Living History
(Info coming soon)

Mannequins for Uniform Display
Make them yourself!


Arms Collectors.com
Main Page

 
 

 

THE JENKS-REMINGTON SINGLE SHOT BREECHLOADING PERCUSSION CARBINE

(A.K.A. As "Mule Ear" and Improved Jenks Carbine)

 

A U.S. NAVY "MULE EAR" CARBINE WITH TAPE PRIMER

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Obverse View

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Reverse View

 

This carbine is .54 caliber with six groove rifling. The overall measurement, in a straight line from the heel of the butt to the bottom of the barrel front, is 40¾". The barrel length is 24¼". The black walnut stock ends 1-3/16" from the barrel muzzle. The tang and breech strap lever measure 6-3/8" from the front of the breech to the rear of the tang. The lock length is 6-5/8". It is equipped with a tape primer device.

 


 

     William Jenks entered into a contract with the Navy on September 22, 1845 for 1,000 of his carbines to be equipped with the Maynard tape priming device . He had four previous Navy contracts dating from 1841 to 1846 for about 4,250 of his initial side hammer percussion "mule ear" carbines. These earlier weapons were manufactured by N.P. Ames of Springfield, Mass. from 1841 to 1846. In 1846, the final contract was purchased from Ames along with William Jenks, personally and most of the carbine making equipment by E. Remington of Herkimer N.Y. who completed the contract obligations. Remington then filled the contract of September 22, 1845 calling for 1,000 Maynard tape equipped carbines. These arms were not a conversion of the original Jenks carbines, but wholly new carbines with the inventor himself supervising the entire production of this well made and handsome arm.

 

     It should be noted that one of the former Ames employees who accompanied Jenks to Herkimer, N.Y. was Fordyce Beals, a highly accomplished mechanic and armorer who would later put Remington into the arms making fore-front by his design of the Beals and Remington revolvers.

 


 

Jenks Lockplate & Barrel Markings

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Lock Marking

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Side View Closed

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Lock Plate Marking

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Barrel Marking

 

     The lockplate is stamped rather faintly. It reads "REMINGTON'S/HERKIMER/ N.Y." in three horizontal lines. The barrel markings are "W. JENKS", stamped lengthwise on the barrel, over the four line upright stamping of "U.S.N/RP/P/1847/CAST-STEEL". "RP" was Richard Paine, the inspector. The separate "P" is for proofed.

 

Other Markings

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Breech Lever Marking

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Stock Cartouche

 

     The only other legible marking found on this carbine is the serial number "96" which is stamped on the bottom inside of the breech lever. If one uses their imagination, a hardly visible cartouche can be seen on the left side of the stock more or less opposite the lock.

 


 

Loading From The Breech

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Chamber Open

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Breech Open

 

     The Jenks-Remington carbine operated in the same manner as the earlier Jenks. The breech lever when raised, draws the sliding bolt rearward, opening the chamber for loading of the wrapped powder charge and round ball. Lowering the breech lever moves the bolt forward placing the powder charge under the priming vent (nipple) on the right side of the barrel. The cocking of the side swing (mule ear) hammer outward actuates the Maynard priming tape into position under the hammer.

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Maynard Priming Device

 

     The door of the Maynard priming device can only be opened when the weapon is cocked.

 


 

Miscellaneous Views

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Trigger Guard Ring

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Stock End

 

Cleaning Brush

 

     A sling ring is attached to the rear of the brass trigger guard. The stock ends 1¾" from the muzzle. As can be seen, the weapon is not fitted for a ramrod. A cleaning brush attached to a cord was used for swabbing out the barrel. A typical carbine cleaning brush is pictured. It is not necessarily a Jenks cleaning brush.

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Barrel End View

 

The Jenks-Remington Single Shot Breechloading Percussion Carbine - Inside Barrel

 

A look and an inside view of the business end of the Jenks barrel.

 


 

NOTES

 

      Navy records as detailed in "CIVIL WAR SMALL ARMS OF THE U.S. NAVY AND MARINE CORPS" by John D. McAulay indicate that by 1861 these carbines were in inventory only at some Navy Yards. Official memos stated that they were not to be issued unless no other arms were available. None were noted to be in the inventory of any ships after that date. However, this carbine served as a companion piece to the Model 1842 Single Shot Percussion Navy Boxlock pistol before and during the War with Mexico as well as in the far east and all other countries that the U.S. fleet and Marines visited.

 

     Civil War usage, if any, would have been minimal. It is not known if any of these carbines found their way into southern armories or onto southern ships.

 

     References used for this posting are "UNITED STATES MILITARY SMALL ARMS 1816 - 1865" by Robert M. Reilly, "FLAYDERMAN'S GUIDE TO ANTIQUE AMERICAN FIREARMS...AND THEIR VALUES" by Norm Flayderman and "CIVIL WAR SMALL ARMS OF THE U.S. NAVY AND MARINE CORPS" by John D. McAulay. Some descriptions are verbatim. 

 

My thanks, once again, to my webmaster and son, Reed Radcliffe. 

Dave Radcliffe